Sep
04
2017

6 Boxes Your New Filtration Media Should Tick

Filtration equipment consists of several components. The machines often have a centrifuge or vacuum chamber, some kind of rotor, a storage sump, and an elimination bin. Certain sections of the equipment are lined with filtration fabrics to separate the recycled material from the disposed of contaminants. As you choose your filtration media, you should start with the fabric blend, to ensure it meets your needs. Here are a few more things to look out for:

Highly absorbent

The primary function of filtration media is to sift air or liquid and prevent contaminants from getting into the clean media sump. For this reason, your media needs to be absorbent enough to hold a large volume of contaminant material before requiring replacement. It also needs to be strong enough to hold all this liquid content without tearing to bits. Sometimes, filtration media is used to absorb spills and soak up leakage. High absorption rates are helpful here as well, especially for soaking up heavy liquids like oil and industrial solvents.

Stays strong when wet

Some materials are strong when dry but they get rather flimsy when they’re exposed to moisture. As you select your filtration media, make sure you spill a little liquid on it as a test. In fact, if your filtration media will be used in a wet set-up, then test it with a lot of liquid. The last thing you want is for your media to disintegrate right in the middle of your cleansing process. Air filters may not need to be as strong since they are not exposed to much moisture. Still, there is often some precipitation and liquid vapour inside air pumps, so make sure the air filters can withstand liquid in case of condensation and humidity.

Easy to cut or subdivide

There are different ways to use filters. Some are placed at the entrance or exit of a machine, while others are laid on mechanical conveyor belts. In addition to varying levels of viscosity, each machine requires a different length and width of filter fabric. Some machines use a layered sump, while others just need a thin film. For convenience and cost-effectiveness, filtration media is usually sold wholesale in massive rolls that can be up to 20 metres long. Make sure your filter is easy to cut into smaller portions. It makes your work easier and prevents wastage. It also helps with storage, because you can divide it into sizes that fit your warehouse shelves.

Capable of trapping particles

Different kinds of filters are used for different filtration functions. Air filters need to have finer gaps than liquid filters. They also need to be lighter in weight, so that they allow efficient air circulation. Liquid filters usually need the capacity to prevent particles of 5 to 150 microns. Air filters need to be finer, trapping contaminants as small as 3 microns. Once you’re done with your filters, you’ll need to dispose of them. Whenever possible, select green filtration media that can be disposed of in an environmentally friendly manner. You’ll find that manufacturing processes generate a lot of used filters, so it helps if they can be disposed of without becoming environmental hazards.

Able to withstand filtration temperatures

Filtration media is used in many applications, including coolant fluid, machining, or hot rolling. The air and liquids that pass through filters are often very hot or very cold. Your media needs to have the capacity to work at these temperatures. Some materials contract when chilled, so if your filtration fibres get tighter, they might restrict materials that are intended to get through the filter. This not only reduces the integrity of your filter, it can also cause clogs that stall manufacturing and damage equipment. Similarly, expanding fibres might let through particles that should be kept out of your filtered residue. Make sure your filter has passed both the hot and cold test.

Fits within your budget

When you’re using filters in industrial settings, you want to get the best quality you possibly can. Unfortunately, the ‘best’ sometimes comes with an unfriendly price tag. The manufacturing process is a large scale operation, so a difference of a single cent can quickly pile up. This is even more crucial with recurring expenses, and filtration media falls under this category. Shop around to see what filter options are available. Test them against each other and get recommendations. Then, get the best grade within your allocated budget. Over-spending might get you a better filter, but that increased value could eat into your profits by raising production costs beyond reason.

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